• CNBCHow a drug company fighting depression and schizophrenia avoids 'ripoff' drug prices

    Lundbeck’s CEO Kare Schultz said he’s not concerned about the president’s tweet on “ripoff prices” aimed at the CEO of Merck. Schultz said generics keep Lundbeck’s drugs cheap for patients, while innovative therapies create higher-value products. President Donald Trump attacked a pharmaceutical chief executive over “ripoff drug prices” on Monday, but Lundbeck CEO Kare Schultz doesn’t anticipate a similar fate Read more...

  • New York TimesThe Dogs We Run For

    Earlier this year, I hired a new running coach. I’d done my first ultramarathon the previous fall, a 50K trail race, and wanted to do it again, but better.Two days after I hired him, my dog died.Of course I expected to keep running. I’d used it in the past to grind down feelings of hopelessness and frustration and loss. Running Read more...

  • CNBCVideo games could soon replace pills in treating Alzheimer's disease and depression

    Patients suffering from mental disorders ranging from depression to Alzheimer’s disease may soon be able to swap their pills for video games. Neuroscape, a research lab at the University of California at San Francisco, has spent the past eight years pursuing that mission. Now, a spin-off called Akili Interactive Labs is engaged in medical trials to get games approved by Read more...

  • ABCWATCH: Spotting depression on Instagram

    On today’s big board an eye opening study about Instagram. Researchers at Harvard found it can help diagnose depression. It is not only the photos but the colors and clinical psychologist Dr. Elizabeth Lombardo is joining#us now. Dr. Lombardo, thanks for joining us. Tell us about the findings in the story. Yes, so what they did was looked at the Read more...

  • CBS NewsInstagram pics may offer snapshot into mental health

    The photos you post on Instagram can contain telltale visual clues that help predict if you’re suffering from depression, a new study reports.Computer software designed to scan photos for these hidden signals accurately diagnosed people with depression seven out of 10 times, said lead researcher Andrew Reece. He’s a graduate student with the Harvard University psychology department.”Depressed individuals in our Read more...

  • ABCYour Instagram feed may reveal if you have depression, study finds

    Your Instagram feed may be better at recognizing signs of depression than your doctor, according to a study from researchers at Harvard University and the University of Vermont. Researchers used a machine learning computer program to analyze 43,950 Instagram photos from 166 participants. They found that the computer’s analysis of Instagram feeds was better at diagnosing depression than a general Read more...

  • Voice of AmericaSocial Media Posts Could Help Diagnose Depression

    Facebook, Twitter, Instagram allow us to share aspects of our lives with our friends, family and the world. But what does what we are sharing say about our state of mind? Some new research suggests that it may be telling the world a lot more than we think. Kevin Enochs reports. Read the story on Voice of America.

  • The Columbus DispatchArt appreciation program helps veterans deal with anxiety, depression

    Holly Zachariah The Columbus Dispatch @hollyzachariah He calls it “sitting with the discomfort,” learning to deal with the anxiety he feels when talking to people he doesn’t know or being in unfamiliar situations. Even now, as B.J. Stull speaks about it, he glances at the friendly face of the woman sitting beside him, hoping for maybe a smile or a Read more...

  • The Columbus DispatchTheater Review | 'Into the West': Irish tale melancholy, meaningful

    By Michael GrossbergFor The Columbus Dispatch Playful and funny but achingly wistful, “Into the West” demonstrates the power of Irish legend and the simple magic of story theater. Tantrum Theater’s nimble season finale offers delights for all ages. The elegant art of doing more with less is beautifully embodied in Greg Banks’ 65-minute one-act adaptation of Jim Sheridan’s screenplay for Read more...

  • CNBCTeens are more depressed and isolated than ever because of smartphones, researcher claims

    Jean Twenge, a professor at San Diego State, argues in The Atlantic this week that smartphones may be destroying a generation of teens Today’s teens go out less, date less, and feel more depressed and suicidal, according to Twenge’s data. There’s a strong link between the amount of time they spend looking at screens and how sad they feel. Teenagers Read more...