• CNBCGene editing removed a big obstacle to transplanting organs from pigs to people

    Transplanting organs from pigs to humans could save lives Process has some major risks CRISPR editing appears to have solved one big problem A team of researchers say they have brought scientists one step closer to safely transplanting organs from pigs into humans. Researchers from a biotechnology startup eGenesis and several universities in China, Denmark and… Read more on CNBC.

  • CBS NewsOne step closer to using cloned pig organs in human transplants

    An average of 22 people die in America every day while waiting for organ transplants. A group of researchers affiliated with Harvard University hope to eventually change that statistic by using organs from cloned pig cells. Their method uses the powerful technology called CRISPR to edit the DNA of the animals. Dr. David Agus joins “CBS This Morning” to discuss Read more...

  • The San Diego Union-TribuneGenome leader Illumina expands again in San Diego

    Like a fast-growing child constantly outgrowing clothes, biotech giant Illumina has trouble keeping up with its continued expansion.So on Monday, the San Diego genome sequencing leader is scheduled to open a new addition — a 7-acre, 316,000 square-foot complex called the i3 campus. Illumina considers it an extension of its headquarters, less than a mile away in the University Town Read more...

  • The San Diego Union-TribuneGenome leader Illumina expands again in San Diego

    Like a fast-growing child constantly outgrowing clothes, biotech giant Illumina has trouble keeping up with its continued expansion.So on Monday, the San Diego genome sequencing leader is scheduled to open a new addition — a 7-acre, 316,000 square-foot complex called the i3 campus. Illumina considers it an extension of its headquarters, less than a mile away in the University Town Read more...

  • CNBCHere are 4 top biotech stock ideas from Jefferies

    Jefferies’ research team shared its favorite biotech stock picks that it expects will benefit from upcoming news events. “Inside this report we have selected … notable stock catalysts over the next 6 to 12 months within the Jefferies Biotech universe,” wrote analyst Michael Yee in Sunday’s note. The firm focuses on “near-term events into year-end where we think risk/reward is Read more...

  • TechCrunch7 ways CRISPR is about to change our world

     Would you eliminate cancer if you had the power to do it? How about ridding the world of HIV or wiping out Zika-carrying mosquitos? CRISPR, a new gene editing technique helping scientists snip out unwanted DNA fragments with surgical precision, promises to do just that — and it could radically change our world in the very near future. This new Read more...

  • FOX NewsMartin Shkreli trial: A timeline of events

    Martin Shkreli, the former biotech CEO known for hiking up the price of a life-saving drug, was convicted on federal charges he deceived investors in a pair of failed hedge funds. Read more on FOX News.

  • CNBCBiotech pops more than 70% after FDA panel greenlights hepatitis B vaccine

    Dynavax stock is taking off after an FDA committee pushed its drug Heplisav closer to approval. The biotech will find out by August 10 if the FDA approves the drug for use on hepatitis B patients. J.P. Morgan analyst Anupam Rama believes Heplisav’s approval is now highly probable. Dynavax stock rocketed up more than 70 percent in midday trading Monday Read more...

  • The Seattle TimesJurors set to hear closing arguments in ‘Pharma Bro’ case

    NEW YORK (AP) — Wealthy investors say former biotech CEO Martin Shkreli told them he was managing tens of millions of dollars’ worth of investments, that they were making double-digit returns and they could withdraw their money at any time. Prosecutors in closing arguments Thursday at Shkreli’s securities fraud trial said it was all a brazen con. The defense countered Read more...

  • FOX NewsDozens of US clinics sell unproven stem cell therapies for heart failure

    Stem cell therapy isn’t approved to treat heart failure in the U.S., but dozens of clinics nationwide advertise the treatments anyway, often charging thousands of dollars for procedures that may not be safe or effective, a new study suggests. Read more on FOX News.